The 2017 Annual SEDAAG Meeting will offer the opportunity to participate in one of the two following optional field trips:

 

Noxubee Refuge: $35 – Sunday, November 19, from 8:30 a.m. to noon

https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Noxubee/

Host: Toby Gray

Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), more than 48,000 acres, is located in three counties (Noxubee, Oktibbeha, and Winston) and was created from lands obtained through the 1930s Resettlement Administration. Before government ownership, the land area within the refuge was intensively farmed and overgrazed. The refuge provides needed habitat protection for extremely valuable, rapidly disappearing bottomland hardwood forest communities. The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker relies on the refuge for its existence in east-central Mississippi. The refuge is one of only four Mississippi sites where the species can be seen. In addition, many neotropical migratory bird species greatly benefit from the variety of habitats the refuge provides. Four green-tree reservoirs (GTRs), two major lakes (the 800-acre Bluff Lake and 400-acre Loakfoma Lake), 16 small impoundments, and assorted wetland areas provide important habitats for the wood stork, American alligator, bald eagle, and wintering waterfowl. The National Audubon Society has designated Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge as an Important Bird Area (IBA), one of five of global importance in Mississippi.

 

The Mill at MSU Trip: $5 – Sunday, November 19, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

http://themillatmsu.com/

This historic building was a technologically advanced cotton mill in 1902. From the website link above: “Crowds from all around made their way to the tiny city of Boardtown [the previous name of Starkville] to get their first glimpse of electric lights. Lit up at night while workers on the inside produced world-standard quality fabric, those on the outside looked on in awe at the brand new cotton mill … Nearly 50 years after the last thread of ‘Starkville Chambray’ was produced, The Mill at MSU reopened with the same excitement and promise as more than 100 years before.”